• The American bass master takes UK dubstep and chucks it back at us louder and heavier than ever

    Starkey - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    Reviewed by Louise Brailey Source: (NME Online)

    <b> Starkey </b> - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    Northern accents. Irony. Guinness. Some things don’t translate across the pond. Given the British sensibility that resonates from grime and dubstep – that which speaks of high-rise estates and history written in old rave flyers – maybe at one point in time these genres would be included in that list too. Not any more, thanks to Philadelphia’s Starkey.

    His 2008 debut ‘Ephemeral Exhibits’ was an outsider’s take on our inner-city
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  • Ear Drums and Black Holes

    Starkey - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    Reviewed by Noel Gardner Source: (Drowned in Sound)

    <b> Starkey </b> - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    While many are suspicious of producers who assign their music its own genre tag - ‘street bass’ in this instance - it does make a certain sense for a dude who seems to be cribbing from dubstep, last-decade electronica, grime, G-funk, r&b and Baltimore club, without fitting into any of them for more than a minute or two. From Philadelphia, where him and his pals have spent the last six years or so throwing parties to showcase genres that would
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  • Saddle up for an intergalactic sonic journey, moving both air and brain-cells.

    Starkey - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    Reviewed by Adam Kennedy Source: (BBC Website)

    <b> Starkey </b> - Ear Drums And Black Holes

    utter Music, the standout track on Philadelphia producer Starkey’s 2008 debut album Ephemeral Exhibits, said everything about his self-dubbed ‘street bass’, an explosion of sub-woofer-cracking beats best imbibed via a block-wobbling car stereo. Starkey, aka Paul J Geissinger, has diversified big, bad and bassy extremes this time around, however, lending Ear Drums and Black Holes similarly accurate titular peeps through the keyhole.
    A homeland
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